Brussels Halts 5G Deployment Indefinitely: Not Compatible With Radiation Safety Standards

Preliminary 5G networks are set to roll out in China, the United States, South Korea, and Japan…

In the next year, preliminary 5G networks are set to roll out in China, the United States, South Korea, and Japan. In the next seven years, operators are projected to invest over $1 trillion to expand 5G wireless technology. With 5G, the telecom industry promises instant connectivity, paving the way for “smart cities.” 5G is a Big Tech dream come true – a data collection boon that will tie all internet-connected devices together and increase connectivity speeds up to 1000 times greater than existing 4G networks. As investors scramble to get a piece of the 5G pie, the technology is not projected for deployment in every first-world country, nor will it be accepted by every big city. Continue reading

Processed foods make us fatter, lead to cancer, and are linked with early death

…but what exactly is a processed food?

zz/Dennis Van Tine/STAR MAX/IPx 2018 via AP Images

Hot dogs qualify as an ultra-processed food, since they’re packed with preservatives.

They’re quick, easy, cheap, and really bad for us.

Processed foods are under fresh scrutiny this week after a groundbreaking study from the National Institutes of Health found that people on ultra-processed diets ate more calories and gained more weight than they did when offered the same amount of nutrients from less processed food.

The finding suggests there’s something different about how quickly our bodies take in processed foods and how those foods interact with key hormones that help regulate our appetites.

But this is far from the first time that processed foods have been linked to dangerous outcomes. Other researchers have connected packaged and ready-made foods with more cancer cases and more early deaths.

This mounting evidence raises a somewhat tricky question: What exactly designates a certain food as processed? After all, a chicken-salad sandwich prepared at home may still qualify as a processed meal, as could a cheesy quesadilla.

Flickr/geishabot

To answer that question, scientists and nutrition experts often use a a four-tiered system called NOVA that classifies everything we eat as one of these four categories: unprocessed or minimally processed, processed culinary ingredients, processed foods, and ultra-processed food and drink products.

Unprocessed foods include edible parts of plants (fruits, vegetables, seeds, roots, etc.) or animals, as well as fungi and algae. These can be fresh, frozen, or even fermented — the important distinction is that they have not been treated with additives, injected with salt, or rubbed with oil until they’re about to be eaten. Examples include dry beans; grains like rice; fresh or dried mushrooms; meat and dairy products; seafood; plain yogurt; nuts; and spices.

Processed culinary ingredients involve a step up in production. These are ingredients made from unprocessed foods, like vegetable oils, butter, and lard. This category also includes extracted food, like honey from combs, sugar from cane, and syrup from maple trees.

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Processed foods are items that get infused with ingredients like sugar, salt, and fat to help keep them edible longer. Canned fruits, fermented breads (which most breads are, as they’re made with yeast), alcohol, cheese, pickles, and salted nuts all make this list.

Finally, there are ultra-processed foods. These items are designed to be ready to eat and ready to heat at a moment’s notice. To make that possible, these foods are often made in a factory, broken down from their whole or fresh form and treated with thickeners, colors, glazes, and additives. They may be fried before they’re packed in cans or wrappers. They might contain high-fructose corn syrup, protein isolates, or interesterified oils (replacements for trans fats, which are now widely banned). Examples of ultra-processed foods include packaged granola bars, carbonated soft drinks, candy, mass-produced breads, margarine, energy drinks, flavored yogurt, chicken nuggets, and hot dogs.

These are the items researchers are referring to when they say that ultra-processed foods are linked to more cancer cases, early deaths, and weight gain.

Of course, these items also tend to be more convenient and cheaper than less processed food, since they’re less perishable.

Via Flickr

“Ultra-processed food has a lot of advantages in terms of its convenience,” Kevin Hall, the lead author of the NIH study, told Business Insider. “It’s cheap. It sticks around for a while. You don’t have to have all the fresh ingredients on hand, which might spoil. You don’t have to have all the equipment to prepare these meals from scratch.”

But experts, including Hall, say that if you can afford it, cutting back on ultra-processed food is a good strategy for maintaining a healthy weight and staying disease-free.

“You can’t just tax them and make them more expensive and less convenient for people,” he said. “You also have to support access and availability to unprocessed meals.”

Written by Hilary Brueck for Business Insider ~ May 17, 2019

Eat more fruits: These 12 nutrition powerhouses are high in health benefits and low in calories

Eating fruits offers tremendous health benefits — a fact supported by many studies. These are rich in vitamins and minerals, great for keeping diseases at bay, and have high levels of soluble and insoluble fiber, which improves digestion, increases satiety, and lowers cholesterol. But did you know that some fruits might be better than others, in terms of micronutrient content? Continue reading

War on words: Cancer is a Disease, Not a Battle

‘Battling metaphors hold an implicit suggestion that patients who succumb quickly have in some way failed to fight hard enough.’ ~ Jacinta Elliott

Photograph: Voisin/Phanie/REX Shutterstock

Letters: Emeritus professor Alan Bleakley and cancer patient Jacinta Elliott on the use of military metaphors, and Adrienne Betteley of Macmillan Cancer Support on end-of-life care Continue reading

Letter to an oncologist: Do you remember my mum?

Ten years after I treated her dying mother, this aspiring doctor wants to meet me

Dear Dr Srivastava, you won’t remember me.

My eyes fly to the bottom of the page and I feel a thud in my chest. You couldn’t be more mistaken, I murmur.

You used to tuck yourself in next to the sink in my office, the one with the annoying water tap that would start gushing at the slightest movement and embarrass you until I gently suggested that I had the same problem and you should move your chair a little closer to my desk. Continue reading

Addiction expert claims giving your child a smartphone is like giving them a gram of cocaine

The world is changing at a dramatic pace. It’s shifting so fast, in fact, that the childhood you remember is vastly different than the one your own kids will experience. This is largely due to the development and saturation of technology in modern society.

While there are perks to being hyper-connected, allowing children access to their own smartphone could produce detrimental effects long-term. Continue reading

New Discovery Points to an Overlooked Cause of Alzheimer’s

When it comes to treating somebody who is just beginning to suffer Alzheimer’s disease, the conventional medicine folks have a big problem.

They don’t know how the disease starts. So they can’t catch it at an early stage. In fact, 20 years ago when my mother was developing dementia, her doctor didn’t know a thing about it. Continue reading

An Apology Letter from Dr. Rachael Ross

I’ve ordered thousands of vaccines in my career as a physician. Until recently I had never considered vaccine injury as more than folklore. Weeks ago I never would’ve believed a story about vaccine injured triplets…so the past few weeks have been difficult. I have struggled to make sense of all that I have seen and learned. I met a mother of triplets the other weekend, a very attractive white woman with years added onto her face and her smile. She recalled to me the day her triplets were born. She and her then husband were ecstatic that she was able to carry them for 36 weeks. Continue reading

Stomach Cancer Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment

If stomach cancer is diagnosed, the next step is to determine the stage of the cancer, which indicates how far it has spread, if at all. – ID 82025069 © Christian Weiß | Dreamstime.com

More than 26,000 people in the United States—approximately 16,000 men and 10,000 women—are diagnosed with stomach cancer every year, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS), and nearly 11,000 die from it. The cancer develops for unknown reasons and can be difficult to diagnose early, because its symptoms mimic those of other gastrointestinal diseases. Continue reading

Normal PSA Levels by Age: A Valid Way to Assess Prostate Cancer Risk?

Can we count on normal PSA levels by age? Regardless of any PSA reference range for different age groups, there’s actually no ‘normal’ prostate-specific antigen level that guarantees you’re free from prostate cancer.

What is a PSA Screening?
A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening a simple blood test that measures that assesses your risk of prostate cancer. Generally, your risk of having prostate cancer increases along with your PSA level, and in most men, PSA concentrations rise with age, for various reasons.

Although experts have devised age-adjusted PSA reference ranges to estimate your risk of prostate cancer, there really are no truly normal PSA levels by age. In other words, although PSA can give you an idea of your risk, there’s no guarantee that you have prostate cancer if your PSA rises above a certain mark, nor are you assured of being cancer-free if your PSA remains below a particular threshold. Continue reading

Heart Wrenching… Know Your Rights!

It’s time… I’ve held my story in for six months, save for a few close friends and family knowing, and it’s time to break the silence of fear. The fear of repercussions that would come from sharing this with anyone who may not know me personally or understand the nuances of what happened. The fear of offending someone who holds a different belief system than I do. Fear of someone who may think I am ungrateful or unkind. Fear that I may get negative feedback or retaliation.

Despite all of those fears, I have to trust that speaking out and sharing my story could help a mama or daddy out there somewhere find the courage they need to stand up for themselves. I am writing this to you… so here it goes…(deep breath)… Continue reading